Mountain Village Farm to Community Program Delivers 4,500 Pounds of Locally Grown Food to Community Members

Farm to Community Program

Words by Zoe Dohnal / Community, Environment

The Town of Mountain Village’s Farm to Community Incentive Program surpassed expectations in its inaugural year by delivering over 4,500 pounds of locally grown food and produce to community participants. Developed by Michelle Haynes, planning and development services director as a “climate action plan implementation measure,” the Mountain Village Green Team Committee unanimously supported the program along with the Town Council.

38 income qualified Mountain Village residents took part in a 14-week local farm share food program with an outcome exceeding the program’s goal of providing nine weeks of low-cost, high nutrient foods all while lowering carbon emissions by delivering a regionally grown food. Furthermore, the program gave a unique opportunity for Mountain Village residents to interact with local farmers, encouraging the use of new foods and recipes, and minimizing the time and distance for food shopping.

“I am so grateful for this program,” said one program participant, Melissa Touhly. “I’m a single mom with two daughters, and they started taking fresh salads to school because they loved the produce and the story of where the food sourced.”

Heather Knox shared similar sentiments by adding, “my two girls, ages 12 & 14, and I ate many more vegetables and fruits than I would normally purchase. It was fun introducing new vegetables that I had not ever seen, and figuring out how to cook them, or following the recipes included with the weekly bounty. I also really enjoyed getting to know ‘Farmer Sam’, with the Fresh Food Hub.”

The Town has approved an expanded program for 2019 with participating farms Mountain Roots Produce based in Mancos, Colorado and the F.R.E.S.H Food Hub, a community-run food co-op based in Norwood, Colorado. F.R.E.S.H Food Hub purchases food from local farms and producers such as Indian Ridge Farm and Bakery, Buckhorn Gardens, Birdhouse Farm, Laid Back Ranch, South River Aquaponics, and many more small-scale producers on the western slope.

2019 program applications are available February 1 for Mountain Village residents living in deed-restricted housing or meet the annual household income qualifications.

Furthermore, the town hopes to reduce their carbon footprint further and support the regional economy by developing a residential Community-supported agriculture (CSA) pick-up and a Town-led employee CSA wellness program.

Planning and Development Services Director, Michelle Haynes explains, “The Town of Mountain Village offers a wellness program benefit to employees that can be used in place of the purchase of a ski pass. The town agreed that participation in a CSA meets the wellness criteria. We hope to place a request for proposal this winter to work with a local farm in exchange for providing CSA shares to employees through the town’s wellness program this next summer.”

Haynes goes on to say, “with the success of the Farm to community program and positive farm presence at the Market on the Plaza this past summer, we hope that we can reach a critical mass of CSA share participation so that shares can also be delivered to the Mountain Village for residents and take advantage of the delivery route for wholesale distribution to local restaurants.”  “Supporting the local economy and taking advantage of our local food sources is important to a resilient and healthy community.”

For program information, please contact Zoe Dohnal by email by phone (970) 728-8236 or by visiting townofmountainvillage.com/farm-to-community.

Thanks to our Partners and Participants for the Inaugural Mountain Village Community Clean-Up Day

Words by Zoe Dohnal / Community, Environment, Event

The Mountain Village Community Cleanup Day and Celebration was a great success!! 

We had 100 participants and four truckloads of trash!

Thank you for all who came out to celebrate the beauty of where we live and taking steps to keep it that way.

The Mountain Village Green Team would like to thank our Partners:

Telluride Trappings & Toggery
Telluride Sports

The Market at Mountain Village

Telluride Festival of Cars and Colors

Babies of the Bush African Wildlife Arts & Gifts

Telluride Brewing Company

Poachers Pub

Tracks Cafe & Bar

Town of Mountain Village Owners Association

Telluride Ski & Golf

Mountain Village Boosts Internet Speeds for Broadband Customers

Broadband Blog

Words by Bill Kight / Community, Utilities

Mountain Village Broadband customers will be able to take advantage of new speed increases in their internet service packages, at no extra cost. Broadband Services Director, Steve LeHane said that it would be increasing the speeds of its Internet service packages for customers in Mountain Village with download speeds increasing up to 65 percent for some customers.

Eligible customers will see significant changes in their service depending on their package. Choice Customers with 12Mbps Internet download speeds are being upped to 20Mbps; Entertainment Internet subscribers who currently have 20Mbps are going to 30Mbps, and Ultimate subscribers are being upgraded to 50Mbps.

New service changes are now in effect. If you continue to experience previous speeds at this point, please contact us for help at (970) 369-0555 or by email.

For questions on your service or to order new or upgraded service, please contact the Mountain Village Broadband Department at (970) 369-0555 and email or by visiting townofmountainvillage.com/internet.

Mountain Village Community Clean-Up Day and Celebration Saturday, August 25 from 12 to 4 p.m.

Community Clean-Up and Celebration

Words by Zoe Dohnal / Community, Environment, Event

Join Town of Mountain Village’s Green Team in cleaning up our trails and ski-runs in Mountain Village, Saturday, August 25 from 12 to 2 p.m. Clean up will be followed by a community-wide party in the Meadows Park, located adjacent from the Meadows parking lot on Adams Ranch Road. Music will be provided by the infamous DJ Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m.

Volunteers are asked to arrive by 11:30 a.m. for registration and groups will be assigned an area of clean-up by a Green Team member at Meadows’s Park. Trash bags are provided, and participants are encouraged to bring gloves, wear long pants, comfortable shoes, and park at the Meadows parking lot (carpooling is encouraged!) Fabulous prizes will be awarded for various trash discoveries. Thanks to thoughtful donations from Telluride Ski Resort, Telluride Sports, the Telluride Trappings & Toggery, Poachers Pub, Tracks Cafe & Bar, Starbucks, Town of Mountain Village Owner’s Association (TMVOA), and others, prizes include a GoPro Hero4, Osprey Exos backpack, Grand Trunk Parachute Hammock, August Ink Sweatshirt and more!

Lunch will be provided for those who attend, and we ask participants to bring reusable plates and cups.

The inaugural event is intended to spread awareness of picking up trash when found, celebrating the beauty of where we live, and taking steps to keep our mountains clean and trash free!

All are welcome to join and take part in the Community Clean-Up Event. For more information on the event, please visit Town of Mountain Village’s Green Team.

Join Mayor Benitez for the Final ‘A Walk with the Mayor’ Event of the Season August 7

Laila-Benitez-Blog

Words by Bill Kight / Community

The final ‘A Walk with the Mayor’ event takes place today, Tuesday, August 7 from 9 to 10 a.m. beginning in Mountain Village’s Heritage Plaza. The inaugural monthly walking series gives community members and visiting guests the opportunity to discuss current events, topics, and town projects that interest them with Mountain Village Mayor Laila Benitez.

“I heard from a lot of people that live here that they would come to see me, but would never come to a Town Council meeting, and it would be great if we had an opportunity to talk that is more casual,” Mayor Benitez said of the idea to host such walks.

If you are interested in talking with Mayor Benitez, all are welcome to join in the walk around Mountain Village. To learn more about Mayor Benitez, please visit townofmountainvillage.com/meet-the-mayor .

Mountain Village Celebrates Safe Communities with National Night Out Event, Food and Ice Cream Social

National Night Out

Words by Bill Kight / Community, Emergency Preparedness

Bringing together community members and emergency responders, the Mountain Village Police Department is hosting their seventh annual National Night Out Tuesday, August 7 from 5 to 8 p.m. The community is invited to join their neighbors, police, fire, and EMS teams at Mountain Village’s Meadows Parking Lot located at Adams Ranch Rd for free ice cream, BBQ, swag, games, and tours of police cars, fire trucks and an ambulance. Food will be provided by Shake N Dog Grub Shack and Telluride Fire.

National Night Out, a part of the National Association of Town Watch, involves over 38 million people in 16,000-plus communities from all 50 states, U.S. territories, Canadian cities and military bases worldwide. This well-known and celebrated annual event was designed to heighten community awareness of safety and fire prevention issues, as well as to strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnership.

National Night Out is one of many ways local police and fire departments become acquainted with our community in a fun and relaxed atmosphere. Come to celebrate this national event referred to as America’s Night Out Against Crime.

“National Night Out provides a great opportunity for our residents to get out and meet the first responders that serve them in the community. It allows our first responders and our neighbors the chance to build a safer community through open communication and community engagement in a fun, relaxed, and inclusive environment, “ said Mountain Village Police Chief Chris Broady.

For more event information, please contact the Mountain Village Police Department at (970) 728-9281.

Telluride Ski & Golf to invest one million dollars into new and enhanced network of Freestyle, Technical & Cross-Country Trails

Bike Park

Words by Bill Kight / Community, Recreation

Telluride Ski Resort (TSG) has started construction of the new Telluride Bike Park with an anticipated opening in June 2019. The park has been designed by, and is being constructed in partnership with Gravity Logic, the Whistler, British Columbia-based industry leader in the design, development and construction of bike parks in North America.

Mountain biking has become a booming global trend. Not only will this park attract more visitors and provide more opportunities and activities for them, it will help stimulate the local economy. Upon its opening in June 2019, the Telluride Bike Park will encompass approximately 15 trails and 17 miles of terrain, designed to appeal to riders and resort guests of a wide variety of ages, skill and interests. The park will also provide lift-serviced access from Mountain Village on the Village Express chairlift (Lift 4).

The terrain will include new Freestyle trails (commonly known as “flow” trails), enhancements to the existing Technical trails (currently managed as the Mountain Village Bike Park), and existing Cross-Country trails within Telluride Ski Resort’s permit boundary (e.g. Prospect Trail, Prospect Loop, Village Trail, Basin Trail, etc.).

In addition, the park will offer lift service, pass sales, guides, clinics and camps from the Telluride Adventure Center in Mountain Village and pass sales location at Oak Street in Telluride.

Additional Facts & Information:

  1. Anticipated opening on the 3rd Saturday in June with daily operation through Monday Labor Day. Saturday, Sunday operations through the 2nd Sunday in October. Weather Permitting.
  2. The cross-country (XC) trails will open at 6:30 a.m. daily, and all access will close 30 minutes before sunset. Before 10 a.m. and after 6 p.m., XC trails will be accessible via the gondola at San Sophia Station and will not require an access pass.
    1. The FREESTYLE and TECHNICAL trails in the Bike Park (including lift access via Village Express – Lift 4) will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., daily.
  3. From 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Telluride Ski Resort will provide the following services across the trail network:
    1. Bike Patrol & Emergency Response Services
    2. Pass sales in Mountain Village and at Oak Street
    3. Pass scanning at Village Express and gondola mid-station
    4. Lessons, instructions, and guides
  4. During operating hours from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., lift access to the Mountain Bike Trail Network will require an access pass.
    1. Before 10 a.m. and after 6 p.m. the FREESTYLE and TECHNICAL trails in the Bike Park are closed, but riders can access the XC trails for free.

Single-Day Trail Access Pass:

Single-Day Mountain Bike Pass: single-day access to all XC, FREESTYLE and TECHNICAL trails, and Village Express (Lift 4). $36/day, which includes a $1 donation to the National Forest Foundation (NFF).

Season Pass Access Products:

  1. TSG Winter Season Pass-holders: Unlimited Mountain Bike Trail Season Pass with access to all XC, FREESTYLE and TECHNICAL trails, and Village Express (Lift 4). $25 NFF Donation.
  2. Non-Winter Season Pass-holders: Unlimited Mountain Bike Trail Season Pass with access to all XC, FREESTYLE and TECHNICAL trails, and Village Express (Lift 4). $199, which includes a $25 donation to the NFF.
  3. XC Trail Season Pass: unlimited access to XC trails, NO Bike Park, FREESTYLE or TECHNICAL trail, or Village Express (Lift 4) access. $25 NFF Donation.

For more information please contact Scott Pittenger, Director of Mountain Operations at Telluride Ski Resort by email.

2018 Red, White and Blues Celebration Expands to Two Days with More Events

RedWhiteBlues_1200x628

Words by Bill Kight / Community, Event

The Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association presents the 2018 Red, White and Blues Celebration taking place July 3-4, 2018 at Sunset Plaza, on the lawn near Lift 1 and at Heritage Plaza near the base of Lift 4.

This two-day event in Mountain Village offers music, kids activities, ice cream social, merchant discounts, food and drink specials, and much more.

“TMVOA is excited to expand our mainstay Red, White & Blues event from one to two days with more music, events and kids activities in Mountain Village,” said Heidi Stenhammer, TMVOA Operations Manager. “We look forward to having our members, guests, and visitors attend this entertaining holiday event.”

Each day will feature children’s activities and entertainment from 1 to 5 p.m., along with music on the Sunset Plaza Stage from 2 to 5:30 p.m. The Red, White & Blues Celebration concert will kick off at 2 p.m. with Boulder, Colorado’s Foxfeather, featuring an Alt-Americana sound bolstered by strong blues-rock. From 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. gospel and blues singer Paul Thorn will take the stage.

On July 4 in Heritage Plaza, the talented Trombonist and New Orleans native, Glen David Andrews, brings his funk, soul, gospel and rock sound with a robust new project that correlates his own reclaimed life to his reclaimed city of New Orleans. Dave Jordan and the NIA, also from New Orleans and Telluride’s own Porch Couch will kick off the day of music in Mountain Village, and rounding out the day of music will be a dance party featuring DJ Kat V from 7 to 9 p.m.

Additional 4th of July events feature a light installation art show in Mountain Village’s Heritage Plaza with Electroliers Light Show’ by local Artist, Katy Parnello. The installation will be on display July 3-6, starting at 9 p.m. each evening. To learn more about the artist, please visit electroliers.com

The Red, White & Blues Celebration is provided free of charge by TMVOA and the Telluride Society for Music. This event is sponsored by Alpine Bank, Madeline Hotel & Residences, Rodney Strong Vineyards, KOTO FM Radio, Telluride Resort Lodging, Telluride Ski & Golf, the Town of Mountain Village, The Peaks Resort & Spa, Telluride Express, and The Market at Mountain Village. The event is rain or shine.

The Common Consumption Area is in effect during the weekend celebrations at Sunset Plaza on July 3 and Heritage Plaza on July 4, allowing patrons to purchase alcoholic beverages from participating licensed establishments attached to the Common Consumption Area and move freely with beverages within the defined boundary of the concert area. Only alcohol from the participating establishments is permitted in the Common Consumption area.

To learn more about the Red, White & Blues concert and event contact the Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association at (970) 728-1904 or by visiting tmvoa.org. For local events, please visit townofmountainvillage.com/events.

A Roundup of Regional Offerings for Fourth of July

Fourth-July

Words by Special Contributor / Community, Event

The Fourth of July is a time of revelry and rejoicing capped off by a large fireworks show. This year, due to wildfire concerns, only one place in the region is still offering a firework display — the City of Montrose. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t anything to do. See below for a roundup of all the Independence Day courtesy of Telluride Daily Planet.

When the sun sets on the Telluride Valley July 4 this year, the commemoration of our nation’s birth will come to a quiet conclusion. Extreme drought and fire danger has meant there will be no fireworks display booming off the canyon walls and sending dogs into paroxysms of fear, but this year’s mid-week holiday is still packed with all the other traditions, new and old, that make Fourth of July in Telluride a cherished, small-town celebration.

In Telluride’s mining heyday, the Fourth of July began with a bang — a very big bang — or two or three. Miners would herald the dawn by exploding dynamite for a “powder monkey’s breakfast,” rousing genteel townsfolk out from under the quilts with pounding hearts and interrupted dreams. While the mines are quiet these days, rumor has it the Tommyknockers (the mythical, Hobbit-like miners of Welsh folklore) are still up to their mischievous ways. You may not need an alarm clock to get out of bed July 4th morning.

Runners of every age may already be awake for the 7th Annual Rundola, a recreational foot race that benefits the Telluride Foundation. With a 13 percent uphill grade and an elevation gain of 1,810 feet, this race is not kidding around. It starts at the base of the gondola at 8 a.m. and runners can either chug up the Telluride Trail, or bushwhack up the side of the mountain to the finish at the top of the ridge near the San Sophia gondola station. It’s crazy, and crazy fun. Register by going to telluride.com/festivals-and-events/7th-annual-rundola.

The flyover of military jets means it’s almost parade time. They thunder overhead, seemingly on a collision course with the mountains at the east end of the valley, only to arch gracefully to the sky, winging to their next small-town flyover.

In what is probably one of the day’s most beloved events, the Fourth of July parade at 11 a.m. can make even the most cynical of us feel patriotic and proud. Who better to lead the parade a than contingent of our local and visiting military veterans, who serve as the parade’s color guard and flag-bearers? The grateful applause they receive as they head down Main Street is deeply moving.

From then on it’s wave after wave of motorcycles, kids (of all ages) on bikes, the summer scientists, dogs, the saucy Silver Belles, kids with super-soakers, babies in wagons, marching bands, rock ’n’ roll bands, hockey teams, actors, unicyclists, jugglers, pool parties, the belly-whistlers, lots of candy-throwing groups, fire-breathing Burning Man floats, the Grand Marshals and other luminaries perched in classic cars — anything or anyone you can think of, marches proudly down main street.

Bringing up the rear of the parade, beautifully done up for the occasion by their proud owners, are the horses. The riders are a mix of horse-loving hobbyists, working wranglers and 4-H kids. Last year, in a lapse of common sense, beach balls were lobbed from a Main Street penthouse onto this part of the parade. Don’t do it. Skittering horses and kids running onto the street to fetch candy is a bad combo. Make sure the horses have passed safely by before lobbing anything onto the parade route.

Fourth in July in Telluride smells amazing (with apologies to our vegetarian and vegan friends), as the aroma of 1,500 pounds of beef and 1,300 pounds of chicken roasting to tender perfection wafts from Town Park. The fireman’s barbeque in Town Park is summer on a compostable plate loaded with tender slices of beef or chicken, doused with barbeque sauce, and sides of baked beans, corn on the cob, and potato salad and a bright, sweet watermelon wedge for dessert.

Telluride Volunteer Fire Department Chief David Wadley is in charge of this year’s festivities. He serves as El Jefe to literally his entire crew of volunteer firefighters — including many who come out of retirement to lend a hand — doing everything from collecting donations along the parade route, to selling beer, to serving the estimated 2,500-3,000 hungry souls who make their way to the park after the parade.

“It’s all hands on deck,” Wadley said. And by that, he means not only the men and women attending to the throngs of red white and blue-clad people, but also standby teams of firefighters ready to respond to any wild land or structure blazes.

Wadley never gets tired of this festive summertime gathering in Town Park. “It’s community I like best about this,” he said. “I like to wander and see everyone. Old-time locals and second homeowners … it’s one of the best community days of the year. Everyone has a smile on their face.”

Be sure to drop a few extra dollars in the bucket if a friendly fire department volunteer comes by. The department is so much more than fireworks, Wadley said. The department not only offers scholarships to local students to the tune of $8,000 per year, but they are currently helping fund the restoration and installation of narrow gauge railroad tracks in Ridgway in a partnership with the Ridgway Railroad Museum. The Galloping Goose that rests in the little park next to the San Miguel County Courthouse is fully functional and hits the rails a few times year. The department is also undertaking the full restoration of the department’s original horse-drawn hose wagon, which was built in 1915. Next on the restoration list will be their 1913 water wagon. And Little Red, the 1940 Ford fire truck that is often in the parade and that sits in Town Park all day for kids to explore, is always in need of upkeep.

“We’re certainly disappointed about the fireworks,” Wadley said, “but everything that’s donated goes back to the community.”

The Placerville Volunteer Fire Department is in charge of the kid’s games, which include a sack race, balloon toss and the trout tank, where kids wade in to try to catch a trout using nothing but their bare hands. The games begin at 2 p.m.

If you need to walk off that hearty meal and you have a sweet tooth, the Telluride Historical Museum at the top of Fir Street at 201 W. Gregory Ave. is offering free admission all day and root beer floats ($5 suggested donation). The museum’s hours are post-parade (12:30-ish) to 5 p.m.

Being the photo-friendly day that the Fourth of July is, consider entering a picture or two taken on this day of days in the Telluride Hot Shot Photo Contest. Judges are looking for the most memorable image that captures the spirit of the day. Photos must be taken on July 4 and within San Miguel County. It’s free to enter and the top prize is $1,000. Check out the guidelines for submission at TellurideHotShotPhotoContest.com

On July 3-4 the Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association presents the 2018 Red, White and Blues Celebration in Mountain Village featuring kids activities, carnival games, an ice cream social, face painting, a magic show, merchant discounts, and live music.

Authorities would like to remind local and visitor alike that fire restrictions and water conservation rules are in effect until the monsoons finally arrive sometime later this summer. And, much as we all miss them, no fireworks of any kind, anywhere. The penalty for lighting fireworks is steep and the fire danger is extreme.

Read Telluride Daily Planet’s full article.

Planet Bluegrass’ FirstGrass Concert Kicks Off Summer Festival Music in Telluride and Mountain Village

FirstGrass 2018

Words by Bill Kight / Community, Event

Nashville-based dynamic, fast picking bluegrass prodigy Billy Strings and Montana bluegrass rock band The Lil Smokies kick-off the 45th annual Telluride Bluegrass Festival at Mountain Village’s Sunset Plaza for the yearly FirstGrass Concert Wednesday, June 20.

Led by two of the most exciting young bands in the progressive bluegrass scene, this promises to be an epic way to begin your Bluegrass weekend in Telluride. This free show runs from 5 to 8 p.m. and is made possible by the Town of Mountain Village and Planet Bluegrass.

After the show, stick around to dine in Mountain Village and for those lucky enough to have a ticket for Planet Bluegrass’ evening celebration with Dierks Bentley and the Travelin’ McCourys head to the Telluride Conference Center as they play to a sold-out crowd. Doors open at 8 p.m. with the show beginning at 9 p.m. For those without a ticket, take advantage of the culinary options in Mountain Village. For more information on the festival, visit bluegrass.com. 

FESTIVAL TRANSPORTATION & PARKING

The towns of Mountain Village and Telluride are connected by a three-stage gondola system starting at Market Plaza (formerly Town Hall Plaza) in Mountain Village to Village Center, and ending in Telluride at Oak Street Plaza. It takes about 12 minutes to get from one town to the other via Mountain Village Center.

During the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, gondola operating hours are from 6:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Expect long lines during peak times. For those needing a ride to their vehicle parked on town roadways, the Planet Bluegrass Bus will pick up festivarians at Market Plaza and drop off passengers near their vehicle. The bus will run Thursday through Sunday from 8 p.m. to 3 a.m., and to assist with locating one’s vehicle, signs denoting specific parking zones – A through G – will be erected. Vehicles left on Mountain Village roadways after 12 p.m. Monday, June 25 will be towed at the owner’s expense. In addition, Dial-A-Ride will remain open until 2:30 a.m. Wednesday through Sunday.

Mountain Village’s Gondola Parking Garage located at 455 Mountain Village Blvd., behind Town Hall and the Mountain Village Market and northwest of the gondola terminal is free to park. Individuals and festivarians without parking permits must park their vehicles where directed by parking staff once the Gondola Parking Garage is full. The North Village Center pay-to-park surface lot is another parking option though overnight parking is not allowed. Short-term parking will be available for those doing business in Mountain Village; times will be enforced. Alternatively, for those parking, shopping, dining or recreating in Mountain Village, we encourage the utilization of Heritage Parking Garage, located off Mountain Village Boulevard across from Hotel Madeline. Parking is $2 for each hour and $35 maximum in a 24-hour period.

COMMON CONSUMPTION AREA

For the FirstGrass Concert, the Common Consumption Area is in effect. The Common Consumption Area will allow people to purchase alcoholic beverages from participating licensed establishments attached to the Common Consumption Area and move freely with beverages within the defined boundary of the concert area. Only alcohol from the participating establishments is permitted in the Common Consumption area.

ABOUT MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

Situated in the heart of the breathtaking San Juan Mountains, Mountain Village was incorporated in 1995 as a home rule municipality.  Its founders envisioned a European-style ski-in/ski-out, pedestrian-friendly destination resort that would complement the historic mining town of Telluride. A three-stage gondola transportation system connects the Town of Mountain Village with the Town of Telluride. Situated at 9,500 feet, Mountain Village is comparably a world apart from other resorts: it is innately spectacular, beautifully orchestrated and planned, and overflowing with style, charm and sophistication. For more information, please visit us on the Web at townofmountainvillage.com. 

ABOUT PLANET BLUEGRASS

For 25+ years, Planet Bluegrass has been redefining the music festival, creating exceptional experiences that protect our planet through environmental leadership and strong communities. Producers of Telluride Bluegrass, RockyGrass, and Folks Festival.

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