Task Force to review initial medical center site plans at a two-day design charrette session

Telluride Medical Center

Words by Nichole Zangara / Development

The Town of Mountain Village is hosting two design charrette sessions to evaluate the initial site plans for the new regional medical center development project. The Telluride Hospital District (THD) Board is proposing to build a 25,000-square-foot medical facility between Mountain Village Town Hall and the Gondola Parking Garage. If financially feasible, this facility may include a second floor, which could house allied health offices in the short-term and serve as an expanded medical center in the long-term. Town Council unanimously agreed to convey roughly a one-acre parcel to the THD in January at di minimis cost. According to Mountain Village Mayor Dan Jansen, the town is excited that the process can shift from site selection to more critical issues.

“While the site selection step was important, the process is now moving into the critical issues of developing the best medical facility, doing so in a fiscally responsible manner, and providing a broader range of services quickly for our communities,” Jansen said.

The proposed medical center is envisioned in the Mountain Village Comprehensive Plan, and due to its location – it falls within the Town Hall Center Subarea Plan – THD representatives will present site-specific development plans to the Town Hall Center Subarea Task Force and members of the public March 31 and April 1.

“The Task Force was created as a condition when the town rezoned several properties within the Town Hall Center Subarea to civic uses. A medical center falls under civic use,” Hawkins explained. “The main responsibility of the Task Force is to review site-specific plans within this subarea in order to ensure that all concerns voiced by surrounding neighbors are considered prior to formal review. During the medical center design charrette sessions, the THD’s architectural firm, Mahlum Architects, will present initial site plans for purposes of obtaining input from the Task Force. Subsequently, the Task Force will provide a non-binding recommendation to the Design Review Board and Town Council.”

The Task Force was formed by way of Town Council appointment in January, and is comprised of four homeowner association representatives from surrounding developments, one Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association Board member, one Town of Mountain Village representative, one Comprehensive Plan Task Force member, and two at large community members. This will be the third time the Task Force will convene formally. This past month the Task Force reviewed The Lofts at Mountain Village development proposal.

Both design charrette sessions will be take place in the conference room in Mountain Village Town Hall on March 31 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and April 1 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The public is invited to attend these meetings in person or watch online at townofmountainvillage.com/video.

Mountain Village celebrates 20 years

Mountain Village Turns 20

Words by Nichole Zangara / Event

Mountain Village has a reason to celebrate: the town turns 20 March 10. Incorporated on this date in 1995, Mountain Village became a home rule municipality, hired staff, and held its first Town Council meeting 19 days later. To commemorate this special day, past and present town officials, staff and community members will gather and share memories of the last 20 years.

“Mountain Village is truly a unique place to live, whether it is our open and spacious setting, one-of-a-kind gondola transit system, unmatched recreational amenities, or even the rare ability for our second homeowners to fully engage in the community by voting in local matters, there truly is no other place quite like our community, and the future looks even brighter,” said Mayor Dan Jansen.

Twenty Years of Mountain Village

March 10, 1995
Incorporated on this date 20 years ago, Mountain Village formally becomes a home rule municipality.

March 1995
Mountain Village hires 10 very special employees; 20 years later they continue to work for the town.

March 29, 1995
Town Council calls its first meeting to order. On the agenda: appointment of offices and departments.

June 25, 1996
The Town of Mountain Village holds its first election with 43 residents and 92 non-residents casting their vote. Since its incorporation, seven mayors have served the electorate.

1996
Mountain Munchkins is a welcomed addition to Mountain Village, and currently offers childcare to 51 families in the region.

December 20, 1996
The gondola opens on this date, becoming the first and only free transportation of its kind in the United States. Almost 20 years later, it is the top rated tourist attraction

July 1999
The town officially opens the doors to the 31,000-square-foot Telluride Conference Center. Today it is still owned by the town, though operated by Telluride Ski & Golf Company.

December 1, 2001
The town accepts deposits for Village Court Apartments Phase II rental units, which includes 90 additional apartments. In all, there are 222 units at VCA, and more affordable housing is envisioned in the Comprehensive Plan.

December 2001
The ski area expands to include an additional 733 acres of skiable terrain accessible by way of ski lift.

2002
Mountain Village joins the World Wide Web at townofmountainvillage.com. In 2015 Mountain Village will launch a new responsive website so it can be easily viewed on any device.

July 2006
Busting at the office space seams, employees move into Mountain Village Town Hall with The Market at Mountain Village as its neighbor. It took just over a year to build Town Hall.

January 1, 2007
From 1995 to 2007, the Mountain Village Metropolitan District provided municipal services like transportation and water. Since this is a typical function of local government, the town gradually took over these services and Metro District formally dissolved. During this same year the town separates from the Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association.

July 22, 2008
Mountain Village kicks off its comprehensive planning process.

September 14, 2009
The Mountain Village Bike Park opens with over 1,000 feet of vertical drop, about 30 berms, and multiple jumps. Today the town continues to make improvements to the park and its entire summer trail system.

October 12, 2009
With demand growing, Mountain Munchkins expands its operations to include 14 preschool-aged children.

June 16, 2011
After a three-year process and 51 public meetings, the Mountain Village Comprehensive Plan is adopted unanimously by Town Council. This guiding document embodies the community’s short and long-term visions for Mountain Village.

January 1, 2012
Mountain Village creates its first department focused on the environment. To date, the town has placed 41 wetlands – or 55 acres – in conservation easements. Also, 375 native mountain bluebirds fledge in nest boxes on the golf course, calling Mountain Village home.

Fall 2012
A critical step in developing an entrepreneurial ecosystem, the Telluride Venture Accelerator opens for business in Mountain Village, attracting over 15 companies and 80 mentors who work on a broad array of cool new products and services.

August 2013
Mountain Village offers its customers 33 percent faster Internet speeds – from 6 MBPS for an individual customer to 20 MBPS – making Mountain Village the best option for Internet service. In 2015 the town will acquire 10 times more capacity, allowing the municipality to offer faster and more reliable service.

March 10, 2015
Mountain Village turns 20!

The developer of The Lofts At Mountain Village presents its initial site plans at a two-day design charrette session

The Lofts At Mountain Village

Words by Nichole Zangara / Housing

The Town of Mountain Village is hosting two design charrette sessions in early March to evaluate the initial site plans for The Lofts at Mountain Village development project. The Lofts developer, Belem Properties Co. LLC, is proposing to build a 43- to 45-multifamily unit professional workforce housing project on the north and east sides of the Gondola Parking Garage. Over the last year the demand for workforce housing has increased exponentially. According to Mountain Village Mayor Dan Jansen, Town Council has moved quickly in response to urgent requests from numerous local businesses to help solve a housing issue.

“The town believes that maintaining a high level of service is critical to our community and it is in the best interests of our residents, businesses and overall economy, but to do so you need quality employees and those employees need a place to live.”

The proposed housing project is envisioned in the Mountain Village Comprehensive Plan, and due to its location – it falls within the Town Hall Center Subarea Plan – Belem representatives will present site-specific development plans to the Town Hall Center Subarea Task Force and members of the public March 3 and March 4.

“The Task Force was created as a condition when the town rezoned several properties within the Town Hall Center Subarea to civic uses. Workforce housing falls under civic use,” Hawkins explained. “The main responsibility of the Task Force is to review site-specific plans within this subarea in order to ensure that all concerns voiced by surrounding neighbors are considered prior to formal review. During The Lofts design charrette sessions, Belem will present initial site plans for purposes of obtaining input from the Task Force. Subsequently, the Task Force will provide a non-binding recommendation to the Design Review Board and Town Council.”

The Task Force was formed by way of Town Council appointment in January, and is comprised of four homeowner association representatives from surrounding developments, one Telluride Mountain Village Owners Association Board member, one Town of Mountain Village representative, one Comprehensive Plan Task Force member, and two at large community members. This will be the first time the Task Force will convene formally.

Both design charrette sessions will be take place in the conference room in Mountain Village Town Hall on March 3 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and March 4 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The public is invited to attend these meetings in person or watch online at townofmountainvillage.com/video. To learn more about this project and the Task Force, visit townofmountainvillage.com.

Mountain Village relaunches its LED instant rebate program after much success in 2014

Words by Nichole Zangara / Environment

It’s lights out on the traditional light bulb for the Rocky Mountain town of Mountain Village. Mountain Village announced today that it is offering its residents and business owners yet another opportunity to save money and energy by switching from inefficient light bulbs to new light-emitting diode technology (LEDs). In partnership with San Miguel Power Association (SMPA) and Cooperative Business Lighting Partners, the program Relight Mountain Village provides instant rebates and exclusive offers to those who purchase LEDs at greenlivingtown.com. The online order period begins March 1 and will run until midnight April 5. Program participants can expect to save up to 75 percent for each LED bulb they purchase.

“Based on the excellent response from the community in 2014 we are launching the program again in 2015 with even more opportunity for the large commercial sector,” stated Environmental Services Director Deanna Drew. “More importantly, this effort is engaging the community while making more people conscious about their energy use. As a bonus, the success of this program has encouraged other communities to follow suit and create their own LED incentive program, including Telluride and San Miguel County.”

In an effort to reduce waste, bulbs will be delivered in bulk and available for pickup at Town Hall Plaza. Customers will be contacted via email regarding the specific date and time for this pickup event.

As for program rules, participants are limited to 50 common LEDs 300 lumens or greater. This limitation ensures that everyone has the opportunity to change the environmental landscape and their monthly electricity bill for the better. Other types of bulbs such as tube lighting and bulbs less than 300 lumens have different rebate guidelines and amounts, which will be automatically calculated during the online ordering process.

Once LED bulbs are installed Drew suggests placing any unwanted incandescent light bulbs in the trash, but warns that fluorescent tubes and compact florescent bulbs contain mercury, a hazardous material that must be properly recycled or disposed of according to San Miguel County guidelines. For more details, visit lamptracker.com. One can also sell or donate their old bulbs and fixtures that still work.

Bight Lights, Big Profits

In 2014, all told, 94 residents and 27 business owners purchased over 4,800 LED bulbs through the Relight Mountain Village program. This translated to a four-month average pay back period and total annual energy cost savings of $71,362. The most popular LEDs purchased were can lights, standard bulbs, and dimmable table lamps and track lighting. Moreover, of the town’s $20,000 Relight Mountain Village rebate fund, $18,214 was applied at time of bulb purchase in addition to about $35,000 from the San Miguel Power Association rebate program.

Changing Landscape

Over the past few years the cost of LEDs has been steadily dropping while making immense gains in energy efficiency. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, lighting accounts for about 10 percent of a home’s electricity use. Since LEDs typically use 75- to 80-percent less energy than the traditional varieties, upgrading one’s lighting source is a step in the right direction, and most of the newer bulbs sold in the U.S. have longer life spans – more than 20 years – so a continual savings is realized well into the future. Moreover, the Environmental Protection Agency estimates that there are three billion incandescent bulbs currently in use. In other words, American households could collectively save $6 billion on energy costs in 2015 alone by making the switch to more energy-efficient lighting.

“Results of switching to an energy-efficient light source like an LED are promising,” said SMPA Accounts Executive Ken Haynes. “For instance, if you were to replace 50 60-watt bulbs in your home that run an average of three hours each day, you have the opportunity to save about $30 each month on your electricity bill. It is because of this that we decided to expand our relationship with Mountain Village and collaborate with them. With our shared commitment to developing programs that work for our members, Relight Mountain Village truly is a win-win for those who participate.”

Mountain Village Mayor Dan Jansen couldn’t agree more.

“Earmarking funds for the energy reduction program Relight Mountain Village show not only the local government’s long-term commitment to being part of the solution, but also the commitment of our residents, business owners and electric power cooperative.”

Relight Mountain Village, a $20,000 funded program, is part of the town’s energy reduction strategy.

Page 20 of 20« First...10...1617181920