Celebrate Thanksgiving in Mountain Village

Thanksgiving blog

Words by Kathrine Warren / Community

There is a lot to be thankful for this holiday season!

For starters, Telluride Ski Resort is opening on Thanksgiving Day for the first time since 2015! There’s snow in the forecast for this week and forecasters are slating this winter to be an El Nino year which always bodes well for Southwest Colorado!

Lift 4 and the Chondola (Lift 1) will open for the season on Thurs. Nov. 22 at 9 a.m. and the following trails will be open:

  • Village Bypass (from top of Lift 4 to Lower Boomerang)
  • Lower Boomerang (from Village Bypass to the base of Lift 4)
  • Upper & Lower Misty Maiden
  • South Meadows
  • The Meadows Learning Center
  • Peaks Trail

Be sure to download the ski area’s new app to stay up-to-date on conditions, terrain and more!

If you don’t make it on the mountain, you can still work up an appetite with San Miguel County’s annual Turkey Trot 5K Run/Walk in Illium Valley. The race starts at the intersection of Sunshine Road and CR 63L (Illium Road). Registration begins at 9 a.m. and the race starts at 9:30 p.m. Costumes are encouraged and dogs on a leash are welcome.

After a long day of skiing, have Thanksgiving dinner at one of Mountain Village’s fabulous restaurants.

Altezza at the Peaks Resort will have a Thanksgiving Day Buffet from 1-9 p.m. Dinner is $60 for adults and $25 for children 12 and under. Call (970) 728-2525 for reservations.

The Madeline Hotel will be offering a Thanksgiving Menu from 4:30-10 p.m. Dinner is $75 for adults and $35 for children. This year residents can also take advantage of Chef Will’s Thanksgiving to Go Option including a full dinner for 6-16 people. Please call (970) 369-8949 for for information and reservations.

For a full list of Mountain Village restaurants, please check out our Dining & Nightlife Directory.

Please visit the Town of Mountain Village’s event page for a full schedule of events this weekend and beyond.

 

 

Mountain Munchkins hosts third annual Family Date Night

Munchkins Family Date Night

Words by Kathrine Warren / Community, Mountain Munchkins

On Friday, Nov. 30, take the family out to the Telluride Conference Center for Mountain Munchkin’s third annual Family Date Night.

All proceeds benefit the scholarship fund at Mountain Munchkins, Mountain Village’s child care center located at Village Court Apartments.

The fun evening will feature a bouncy castle, craft table, pictures with Santa, a ski pass raffle, silent auction and a screening of the film “Happy Feet.”

Admission is $10 (and $5 for kids 12 and under), and there will also be a raffle to win a season’s Telluride Ski Resort pass with raffle tickets available for $10. There will be a cash bar available for adults as well.

The fun will take place 5:30-8 p.m. on Friday. Nov. 30 and the movie will begin at 6 p.m.

Established in 1996, Mountain Munchkins is a licensed infant, toddler and preschool center located at Village Court Apartments in Mountain Village. As a year-round program, it primarily provides childcare service to families who work in the Mountain Village and Telluride region.

Mountain Munchkins is owned, operated and subsidized by the Town of Mountain Village, and supported by grant-funding organizations like the Telluride Foundation, Just For Kids Foundation, CCAASE, Bright Futures and Temple Hoyne Buell Foundation.

UPDATE–Public Notice about Mountain Village Drinking Water

Water Quality Mountain Village

Words by Bill Kight / Public Works, Utilities

WATER QUALITY UPDATE: testing has continued for chlorine levels in the water, and all levels have resumed to normal. It is advised to please flush your home water lines to ensure the chlorine has dissipated from the water in your pipes. For questions or concerns, please contact the Public Work/Utilities Department at  (970) 728-5946

 

CURRENT WATER QUALITY LEVELS 
VCA0.5 PARTS PER MILLION (PPM)
SKI RANCHES0.7 PPM
MEADOWS VIEW APARTMENTS0.45 PPM

Note: Mountain Village’s water supply is typically ranges from 0.5-1 parts per million.

The Town of Mountain Village Public Works Water Department was alerted to higher levels (but not dangerous) of chlorine in the Town’s water supply earlier this week. Due to a glitch in our water treatment system, there was a slightly larger than normal discharge of chlorine into the Town’s water.

Although, this was not an emergency, as our residents, you have a right to know what happened, what you should do, and what we did to correct the situation.

The Town’s drinking water is treated with a small amount of chlorine per state law, and the Mountain Village’s water supply is typically ranging from .5-1 parts per million.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires treated tap water to have a detectable level of chlorine to help prevent contamination. The allowable chlorine levels in drinking water (up to 4 parts per million) post “no known or expected health risks (including) an adequate margin of safety. Only chlorine-based disinfectants can provide lasting protection from waterborne diseases throughout the distribution system from treatment plant to the consumer’s tap.

The water was recorded at Village Court Apartments (VCA) on Wednesday, Nov. 14 at 1.3 parts per million and the town is continuing to flush the system to return to normal levels within the next 24 hours.

The Town of Mountain Village Public Works Department is committed to producing the highest quality drinking water and are making operational improvements in response to the situation through environmental testing and reporting.

For questions regarding the Town of Mountain Village Water, please contact Public Works Director, Finn Kjome at (970) 369-8206 and by email.

Public Notice about Mountain Village Drinking Water

Water Quality Mountain Village

Words by Bill Kight / Community, Public Works

The Town of Mountain Village Public Works Water Department was alerted to higher levels (but not dangerous) of chlorine in the Town’s water supply. Due to a glitch in our water system, there was a slightly larger than normal discharge of chlorine into the Town’s water system.

Although, this was not an emergency, as our residents, you have a right to know what happened, what you should do, and what we did to correct the situation.

The Town’s drinking water is treated with a small amount of chlorine per state law, and the Mountain Village’s water supply is typically ranging from .5-1 parts per million.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires treated tap water to have a detectable level of chlorine to help prevent contamination. The allowable chlorine levels in drinking water (up to 4 parts per million) post “no known or expected health risks (including) an adequate margin of safety. Only chlorine-based disinfectants can provide lasting protection from waterborne diseases throughout the distribution system from treatment plant to the consumer’s tap.

The water was recorded at Village Court Apartments (VCA) on Wednesday, Nov. 14 at 1.3 parts per million and the town is continuing to flush the system to return to normal levels within the next 24 hours.

The Town of Mountain Village Public Works Department is committed to producing the highest quality drinking water and are making operational improvements in response to the situation through environmental testing and reporting.

For questions regarding the Town of Mountain Village Water, please contact Public Works Director, Finn Kjome at (970) 369-8206 and by email.

November Mayor’s Minute

Mayors Minute

Words by Laila Benitez / Mayor's Minute

Hello neighbors,

Below are some Town Council meeting highlights from last month and some upcoming topics. As always, I hope you can join us for tomorrow’s meeting or consider sharing your feedback with us about any of these matters.

October 18 Meeting Highlights

  • Town Council approved, on first reading, an ordinance outlining the legal operation of drones within town limits.
  • To further encourage the development of workforce/deed-restricted housing, Town Council gave direction to town staff to waive and/or reduce related building fees in the 2019 Planning and Building Department Fee Schedule.
  • In an effort to implement the vision of the 2011 Comprehensive Plan, we discussed whether the Community Development Code requirement that major development applications be in “General Conformance” with the Comprehensive Plan is too vague and could hinder implementation of the Comprehensive Plan, as the term lacks clarity. Town Council asked staff to draft an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan that will provide more guidance and certainty as to what “General Conformance” means.
  • Town Council reviewed and prioritized the work plan recommendations provided by AECOM and the Village Center Subarea Committee. The following six items were identified as low-hanging fruit in the Village Center and prioritized as follows:
    1. Improve WiFi speed and connectivity
    2. Explore common consumption approach
    3. Install additional lighting, as needed for safety improvements
    4. Regulate trash and delivery service routes and times
    5. Explore installation of pop-ups in Heritage Plaza
    6. Utilize bus and shuttle drop-off at Blue Mesa to its full potential
  • Lastly, we received reports from the Telluride Conference Center, and Town Hall and Village Center Subarea Committees.

If you would like more specifics about any of these topics, you can review minutes from the meeting or watch the video on the town website.

November 15 Agenda Topics

  • Town Council will review and vote, first reading, the 2019 and revised 2018 budgets. Once the last substantive changes have been incorporated in the 2019 budget, a budget-specific email will be sent out.
  • Consideration of an ordinance to make minor housekeeping amendments to the Community Development Code. These are generally technical amendments identified by staff as needed to improve the zoning/development code administration.
  • Telluride Distilling Company, who has a Manufacturing License and is located in Lawson Hill, has applied to the State of Colorado for an off-site tasting room permit in the Mountain Village Center. This is a state permit and the town does not approve the permit but as a courtesy we may provide comments.
  • Uptown Services, LLC will present the findings of the recently completed Broadband Feasibility Study. In 2019, the town is pursuing a major upgrade to our network infrastructure, with the goal of offering 1G fiber services to every home. Their assessment will help us to determine the timeline and financial viability of this undertaking.
  • Bill Jensen with Telluride Ski & Golf and the Town Hall and Village Center Subarea Committees will provide updates.
  • Lastly, we would like to publicly acknowledge Paul Major’s recent recognition by Colorado Governor Hickenlooper with the Governor’s Citizenship Medal for “Growth & Innovation.”

A full agenda has been posted on our website; we welcome your input and hope to see you at the meeting.

Warm regards,

Laila Benitez
Mountain Village Mayor

Mountain Village Launches Financial Transparency Portal

OpenGov financial portal

Words by Kathrine Warren / Finance & Budget

In an effort to provide the community with a more transparent budget, the Town of Mountain Village announces its new financial transparency portal.

Partnering with OpenGov, a California-based company specializing in financial transparency, the Town now offers in-depth financial reporting with two years of actuals, current and proposed budgets.

“We went with OpenGov to not only open a new, more transparent window to our budgeting process, but to offer staff a more efficient way to submit their budget requests each year,” said the Town of Mountain Village’s Finance Director Kevin Swain.

Since its incorporation in 1995, the Town of Mountain Village has been committed to honest budgeting and financial transparency, and this new portal makes the data clear and easy to understand.

“Transparency is important as it gives citizens and others who are interested another way to understand a complicated document, like our budget, and how it reflects the services the Town provides for its residents, businesses and visitors alike,” Swain said.

The site provides those interested with the opportunity to view, filter and analyze and expenses for the Town of Mountain Village. OpenGov provides that data in interactive charts and graphs.

“The site offers a less complicated way for interested people and organizations to look at and understand what a municipal budget means and looks like,” Swain said.

 

View the Town of Mountain Village’s Financial Reporting Portal

Mountain Village Waives Fees to Incentivize Deed-Restricted Housing Projects

Deed Restricted Housing Incentive

Words by Bill Kight / Development, Housing

The Town of Mountain Village is taking significant measures to incentivize new deed-restricted construction and to encourage maintenance and improvements to existing deed-restricted units.

In its monthly October meeting, the Town of Mountain Village Town Council unanimously voted to waive all planning, development and building permit fees for deed-restricted housing units effective Jan. 1, 2019.

Michelle Haynes, planning and development services director states, “Planning and building permit activity for deed-restricted housing has been minimal compared to free market activity over the past few years.”

“Telluride Ski and Golf last opened 30 apartments in the Meadows called Meadow View Apartments in 2017, and there is one deed-restricted detached condominium in the Boulders currently in design review,” Haynes continued. “As the Town of Mountain Village has 539 built deed-restricted units, the largest number in the region, we continue to explore ways to advocate for affordable housing.”

By waiving town fees, the town aims to encourage owners of deed-restricted units to maintain existing units and offer greater financial incentive to construct deed-restricted units on remaining deed restricted properties.

“The Town had some current incentives in place such as waiving the road impact fee and reduced water and sewer tap fees,” Haynes said. “However, after a review of the existing fee schedule, Haynes stated, “we felt we could do more, and the Town Council unanimously supported this direction.”

For example, a free market building permit with a $1 million valuation would cost approximately$45,000 for the building permit plus $10,000 for the water and sewer tap fees and $3,500  for the design review application. The same permit for a deed-restricted property would cost only $4,000 for the building permit, which is the cost of county taxes, $5,000 for the water and sewer tap fee and no fee for design review.

“The only fee we cannot waive are taxes paid to the county,” stated Haynes, “which constitutes the $4,000 permit fee for a deed-restricted property. By incentivizing, the town hopes to see new construction, remodels, maintenance, and repair.” Haynes said.

For program information, please contact Planning and Development Services Director, Michelle Haynes by email [email protected], by (970) 239-4061 or by visiting townofmountainvillage.com/building-development.

Mountain Village Farm to Community Program Delivers 4,500 Pounds of Locally Grown Food to Community Members

Farm to Community Program

Words by Zoe Dohnal / Community, Environment

The Town of Mountain Village’s Farm to Community Incentive Program surpassed expectations in its inaugural year by delivering over 4,500 pounds of locally grown food and produce to community participants. Developed by Michelle Haynes, planning and development services director as a “climate action plan implementation measure,” the Mountain Village Green Team Committee unanimously supported the program along with the Town Council.

38 income qualified Mountain Village residents took part in a 14-week local farm share food program with an outcome exceeding the program’s goal of providing nine weeks of low-cost, high nutrient foods all while lowering carbon emissions by delivering a regionally grown food. Furthermore, the program gave a unique opportunity for Mountain Village residents to interact with local farmers, encouraging the use of new foods and recipes, and minimizing the time and distance for food shopping.

“I am so grateful for this program,” said one program participant, Melissa Touhly. “I’m a single mom with two daughters, and they started taking fresh salads to school because they loved the produce and the story of where the food sourced.”

Heather Knox shared similar sentiments by adding, “my two girls, ages 12 & 14, and I ate many more vegetables and fruits than I would normally purchase. It was fun introducing new vegetables that I had not ever seen, and figuring out how to cook them, or following the recipes included with the weekly bounty. I also really enjoyed getting to know ‘Farmer Sam’, with the Fresh Food Hub.”

The Town has approved an expanded program for 2019 with participating farms Mountain Roots Produce based in Mancos, Colorado and the F.R.E.S.H Food Hub, a community-run food co-op based in Norwood, Colorado. F.R.E.S.H Food Hub purchases food from local farms and producers such as Indian Ridge Farm and Bakery, Buckhorn Gardens, Birdhouse Farm, Laid Back Ranch, South River Aquaponics, and many more small-scale producers on the western slope.

2019 program applications are available February 1 for Mountain Village residents living in deed-restricted housing or meet the annual household income qualifications.

Furthermore, the town hopes to reduce their carbon footprint further and support the regional economy by developing a residential Community-supported agriculture (CSA) pick-up and a Town-led employee CSA wellness program.

Planning and Development Services Director, Michelle Haynes explains, “The Town of Mountain Village offers a wellness program benefit to employees that can be used in place of the purchase of a ski pass. The town agreed that participation in a CSA meets the wellness criteria. We hope to place a request for proposal this winter to work with a local farm in exchange for providing CSA shares to employees through the town’s wellness program this next summer.”

Haynes goes on to say, “with the success of the Farm to community program and positive farm presence at the Market on the Plaza this past summer, we hope that we can reach a critical mass of CSA share participation so that shares can also be delivered to the Mountain Village for residents and take advantage of the delivery route for wholesale distribution to local restaurants.”  “Supporting the local economy and taking advantage of our local food sources is important to a resilient and healthy community.”

For program information, please contact Zoe Dohnal by email by phone (970) 728-8236 or by visiting townofmountainvillage.com/farm-to-community.

October Mayor’s Minute

Mayors Minute

Words by Laila Benitez / Mayor's Minute, Uncategorized

Hello neighbors,

Below are some Town Council meeting highlights from last month and some upcoming topics. As always, I hope you can join us for tomorrow’s meeting or consider sharing your feedback with us about any of these matters.

  • On October 10, Town Council convened a Special Town Council meeting focused on the 2019 budget where council members reviewed the details of each department’s budget, received the Grant Committee’s recommendations, and discussed upcoming capital improvement projects. Stay tuned for a more in-depth email dedicated solely to the 2019 budget.

September 20 Meeting Highlights

  • Town Council approved a Telluride Bluegrass Festival agreement increasing the cost of festival parking from $40,000 annually to approximately $120,000 annually. The five-year agreement will ultimately generate $600,000 in town revenue earmarked for future Gondola Parking Garage enhancements, after costs for additional support services. The Bluegrass Festival remains the only event to which the town extends an on-street parking privilege.
  • Town Council held a worksession to review the first draft of the 2019 budget. The following key capital expenditures were reviewed and are still under consideration:o    Village Court Apartments estimated 45+ unit expansion
    o    Broadband system fiber capacity upgrades (1G Project)
    o    Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant capacity upgrades
    o    Ski Ranches Water System ongoing infrastructure replacements
    o    Trail improvements within Mountain Village
    o    Village Pond restoration
    o    Completion of wayfinding improvements
    o    Consulting for a possible expansion of the Conference Center
  • Town Council directed town staff to initiate revocation of the Lots 126R and 152R (commonly known as “Rosewood) PUD. The proposed PUD revocation will remove all approvals for mass and scale, previously granted variances, building design, and certain other approvals granted by the expired PUD. Once revocation is completed, any future project on these lots will need a new application and review.
  • We approved a resolution opposing Colorado Amendment 74, a proposed amendment to the Colorado Constitution, which seeks to amend the state constitution to include compensation for any government law or basic local land-use decisions such as zoning or liquor licenses, which might result in a reduction of fair market value of a landowner’s property. This proposed amendment contains expansive language that could result in significant costs to local taxpayers.
  • We reviewed the results of the recently completed Internet Technology Needs Assessment Report by Executech. In the coming year, we will be making changes and upgrades to our IT infrastructure based on this review.
  • Lastly, we received reports from AECOM, and the Town Hall and Village Center Subarea Committees.

If you would like more specifics about any of these topics, you can review minutes from the meeting or watch the video on the town website.

October 18 Agenda Topics

  • On September 23, 2018, Mountain Village lost a dear friend and neighbor with the sudden death of local business (Tracks) owner, Jeff Jurecki. Jeff was an active member of our community, helping his neighbors with generosity and thoughtfulness, and bringing the community together for gatherings at the Meadows Playground. On Thursday, we will consider renaming the playground as the Jeff Jurecki Memorial Playground.
  • Town Council will consider a proposal by the Green Team and the Ecology Commission to pass an ordinance banning single-use plastics.
  • We will review an ordinance regarding the operation of unmanned aircraft systems (drones) within town limits.
  • Town Council will discuss supporting the development and renovation of workforce housing by reducing and/or waiving building fees in the existing Planning and Building Department Fee Schedule.
  • We will discuss whether the Community Development Code requirement that major development applications be in “General Conformance” with the Comprehensive Plan is too vague and could hinder implementation of the Comprehensive Plan as the term lacks clarity. Town Council will consider whether an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan which gives more guidance and certainty as to what “General Conformance” means would be helpful.
  • AECOM and the Village Center Subarea Committee recently came up with expedited workplan recommendations for Town Council to consider. The following seven items were identified as low-hanging fruit to be addressed by December 31, 2018:o    Improve Wi-Fi Speed and Connectivity in the Village Center
    o    Regulate Trash and Delivery Service Routes & Times in the Village Center
    o    Utilize Drop-Off at Blue Mesa Building to its Full Potential
    o    Explore Installation of “Pop-Up” Businesses in Heritage Plaza
    o    Install Lighting for Safety Improvements in Village Center
    o    Explore Open Container/Common Consumption Approach
  • Finally, the Telluride Conference Center, Telluride Ski and Golf, and the Town Hall and Village Center Subarea Committees will provide updates.

A full agenda has been posted on our website; we welcome your input and hope to see you at the meeting.

Warm regards,

Laila Benitez
Mountain Village Mayor

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