2011 Comprehensive Plan Amendment Process

The Town of Mountain Village Comprehensive Plan was adopted in 2011 after a three-year-long development process. It was written to be a 30-year road map envisioning the future use and needs of the community.

Mountain Village Town Council's goal at the time was to both encourage future development while controlling unbridled growth under the guidance of the Comprehensive Plan. However, in the intervening years, Town Council and the community have noted that the Comprehensive Plan is overly prescriptive and complicated in certain respects. The Comprehensive Plan does not reflect current economic realities (e.g., VRBO/AirBNB) that have transformed communities such as ours. As such, we need to amend the Comprehensive Plan to provide future town councils, property owners, and community members solid, yet flexible, guidance to inform and support the critical decisions they will face in years to come.

The Town anticipates a simplification of the Comprehensive Plan that reflects changes to the real economic growth model since 2011. We would like to see a plan that will better withstand the test of time and provide a solid visionary document with an eye toward desired development patterns and growth in the future.

About the Amendment Process

Through a Request for Proposals process in late 2020, the town hired MIG, a national firm with offices in Durango and Denver with extensive experience developing and updating Comprehensive Plans for communities, to reassess the Comprehensive Plan. They gathered input from the community, staff and town council in public virtual forums and in interviews with stakeholders.

During this process, we do not anticipate major chances to the Comprehensive Plan, instead, we expect to:

  • Simplify and modernize the Comprehensive Plan to serve as a guiding document versus a regulatory document
  • Align the plan with the town’s Community Development Code
  • Reexamine Mountain Village’s economic model
  • Review our contemplated growth model
  • Remove overly prescriptive tables, formulas and measures that have been a barrier to future land use